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Shaving indoor cats in the winter Log Out | Topics | Search
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Groomers BBS » Daryl's Domain » Cat Grooming Q&A by Daryl » Shaving indoor cats in the winter « Previous Next »

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justine
Registered Member
Username: justine

Post Number: 393
Registered: 3-2002
Posted From: 68.232.218.240
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 10:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So a man calls up and asks if I could de-matt his badly matted cat becuase he didn't wan't it to be cold. I have done this cat before and have *always* had to use a #10. Not a 7f, a#10. So I explained to him that if the cat is badly matted the hair has probably already begun to pull away from the skin in those areas (explaining how some patches where the matts were are lighter than where the non-matted fur is because the hair under the matts pulls away from the skin) that he would end up looking like lives near Chernobyl. Not to mention the pain that would be inflicted by dematting this badly matted cat. I told him all of it far outweighs the kitty being cold. Now, all of this makes sense in my head. But I figured I'd ask the cat people for a second opinion....Is there really any true reason NOT to shave an *indoor* cat in the winter? And true problems that could be encountered?
I told him to feel free to take it to another groomer and ask if anyone else thought they could dematt it. He declined. Lol
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seleste
Registered Member
Username: seleste

Post Number: 63
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.166.235.37
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 10:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Justine, I have had several clients this time of year with the same concerns about their cat getting cold. IMO, if the cat stays indoors (where it should be kept anyway!) there is no valid reason not to shave it to remove those awful, painful matts. The stress to their skin from having the matts in the first place, then trying to dematt, well it is just too much to put the cat through. Not to mention the negative painful experience of dematting - now you have a cat who really hates being groomed. LOSE/LOSE situation for everyone involved. I will recommend a sweater or t-shirt for their cat if desired and a couple of my clients have done that. But if the cat has a warm blanket or towel to snuggle in at home it should be fine. I do have a client who likes to keep her house around 50 degrees at night. Don't know why, but I did suggest not shaving her cat if it was in that environment. Otherwise, I have not encountered any negative side effects to shaving an indoor cat.

Just curious, do you shave cats that go outside in the warmer months? I won't mainly due to the fear of sunburn, but wondered if other groomers had a different take on it. I will shave them with a #4 leaving about 1/2 an inch, but not with a #10.

Another thing I'm wondering: From reading your posts I know you take the time to talk to your clients and educate them on the proper grooming care for their pets. How often does this guy bring his cat in if you always have to use a #10 and what kind of cat is it? It amazes me that people will wait so long to bring their pet in for grooming. It takes time for the coat to get so badly matted. Regular appointments are sooooo much better for the cat and the groomer and the owner! This is one of those things I think we will always have to deal with, but it really drives me nuts!
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tngroomer
Moderator
Username: tngroomer

Post Number: 418
Registered: 12-2000
Posted From: 64.12.97.9
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 10:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You might also explain to him that matted coats do not insulate properly. The way a cat with an unmatted coat keeps warm is to fluff the coat up, trap air in the fur, and keep a layer of warm air around it. A matted coat cannot "fluff," as it is, um, MATTED! I guess this is a matter of weighing the cats discomfort with matted coat pulling its skin compared to perhaps being a bit cool in the house. As for me, I'd take cool and comfortable over owie mats any day.

Daryl
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justine
Registered Member
Username: justine

Post Number: 395
Registered: 3-2002
Posted From: 68.232.218.240
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 6:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks guys. Yes I have tried to educate them. I recently refused a woman who could not be educated. This cat was terrible. Matted to the skin every 6 months. I had been doing her a while. Then when I was on maternity leave my other groomer did her. The cat bit the restrainer, a vet tech with 20 years experience and the best darn holder I've ever seen. I told her that she needed to bring the cat it when it would cause her less discomfort to be groomed. She called me back 6 months later and I told her I couldn't groom it because I didn't have anyone who was willing to help me restrain it. lol. This 80 year old women offered to help herself. Lol. C-ya!
But yes, there are some I just cannot convince. I have some who are so matted I really should send them to the local vet to get done....But the local vet called me a year ago to ask me what blade to shave a matted cat with.
I will tell him if he is worried he could get a sweater but I'm sure the cat will find the warmest spot in the house.
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lolita
Registered Member
Username: lolita

Post Number: 158
Registered: 7-2003
Posted From: 68.45.212.46
Posted on Sunday, March 14, 2004 - 6:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Seleste that is a good point about shaving outdoor cats and sunburn. I don't take any outdoor cats because I'm too afraid of getting ringwrom.
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seleste
Registered Member
Username: seleste

Post Number: 75
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.166.235.37
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 3:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have you ever contracted ringworm before, lolita? It's not much fun, that's for sure. But both outdoor and indoor cats can get ringworm. And not all cats who have ringworm actually show symptoms. Nice, huh? Ringworm is one of those unfortunate things we just have to expect to see sooner or later. It is not life-threatening, just very irritating. And some clients will lie about whether their cats go outside or not. I groom almost any cat, indoor or outdoor, but I like to know some history about the cat before I groom it. I have had a client swear to me that their cat was indoor only, never went outside, oh no, never! Then when I'm checking out it's tummy while the owner is still there, I find a couple of small twigs, etc. in its coat. The owner, "well, it goes out on our patio sometimes, but that's it." Me, "are you outside with your cat the entire time" Owner, "no, but I know it stays on the patio." Okay-dokay, crazy lady! Anyway, sorry to get off subject. Some clients really crack me up. Believe me, those outdoor kitties really need the occasional bath.
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darkangel_737
Registered Member
Username: darkangel_737

Post Number: 600
Registered: 1-2003
Posted From: 24.25.27.54
Posted on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 6:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't see any reason not to shave an indoor cat when it is cold out. I have 4, count em 4, cats with NO hair, they do not go outside, and they pretty much live on heating vents or under blankets if they get chilly. Cats know how to stay warm.
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wilsurf
Registered Member
Username: wilsurf

Post Number: 52
Registered: 2-2005
Posted From: 24.66.94.140
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 5:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does anyone have any pics of the cats they groomed? I am new to grooming.

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