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Groomers BBS » Animal Ills and Injuries » CANINE BEHAVIOR » Lhasa Apso bites NOW « Previous Next »

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Debra
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 1999 - 5:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dr Easterwood, Please, please help me. I have a 10 year old Lhasa Apro who refuses to be bathed, trimmed or groomed in any way. I visited the Groomers BBS a while back and was given lots of ideas but nothing that would work for Gadget. I was active duty military and have loved this dog since his birth. He has gone everywhere with me -- even Guam! I have always insured that he was cared for by competent, caring professionals. Both groomers and vets. I recently retired and moved home. Gadget now refuses to allow anyone to 'bother' him. The trip to the vet for his exam, shots, and tests required Telazol ($42.00). His last trip to the groomers (located on the vet's premisis) required Telazol. As a retiree I can not afford to pay $45.00 for the grooming and then an additional $42.00 for the Telazol that they have to give him just to groom him! There have been no illnesses in the past several years. There were no abnormalities on his last exam. He will not allow me to trim him, bathe him or groom him in any way. He has bitten ME when I tried! He has the ability to fight his way out of muzzles (I guess because of his short snout). I have had success with tying a nylon stocking piece around his snout. He weighs 28 pounds and is chubby but not obese. Is there some sort of sedative that I can give him at home? Please help me, I have even considered that it may be time to say goodbye and the thought is unacceptable for me.
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Leslie Easterwood, DVM ( - 207.8.1.21)
Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 1999 - 7:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Debra,
It definitely sounds like sedation is in order!!
There are several options for you to consider:
1) The first thing I would suggest is that you keep his coat fairly short, so that groomings can be kept to a minimum. (I am sure you have already decided this was a good option, but I thought I should mention it)
2) Valium: You can keep valium tablets on hand at home, to feed him 20-30 minutes before you want him sedated. This may allow you to muzzle him and get him done at home. This also works fairly well for trips to the vet, if they do not get too stirred up. (Be sure to schedule appts for first thing in the morning, so you do not have to wait long in a crowded waiting room, and so the staff can be geared up for a quick, efficient, non-threatening visit.) If this does not do the trick, then I will frequently use a lower dose of valium that will slow the dog enough that an intramuscular injection of sedation can be given by the owner at home, and then transport to the clinic in a carrier. (I only have one patient that has to come in completely sedated, but he is VERY dangerous to himself and my staff, making veterinary care too risky for all concerned. Most dogs can be handled with valium, and you could keep this on hand at home.
3) Behavioral Evaluation - If you want to pursue an evaluation by a veterinary behavioral specialist, they can usually be located at the veterinary teaching hospitals. They are using more human antidepressants in dogs these days, with fairly good success. This may be an option you want to pursue for long term help.
Talk with your veterinarian about getting a valium prescription to keep at home, and use before he is likely to become unmanagable. If your vet has had to deal with his aggression, they should not be resistant to the thought of sedation.
Good Luck, and let us know how it goes,
Leslie Easterwood, DVM
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Debra
Posted on Thursday, October 28, 1999 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you so much. Will let you know how everything goes. Hope you enjoyed your vacation.
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k9krew ( - 206.127.238.144)
Posted on Sunday, October 31, 1999 - 1:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dr. Easterwood, out of curiousity, what is the dose for valium given to a cat??
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Leslie Easterwood, DVM ( - 207.8.1.21)
Posted on Tuesday, November 2, 1999 - 7:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

k9krew and Debra,
While I was gone, I thought back over my response, and realized I had left out a very important thought!
Valium is generally not my first line of defense for oral sedatives. I usually start off with oral acepromazine, and then move on to valium if necessary. I assumed that acepromazine had already been tried in this case, since it is a very common drug for these cases, so I did not mention it. I did not want that to be misleading for other cases. Some of the easier cases will respond very well to acepromazine, and the problem will be solved. This case has progressed past that stage, so I would not change my recommendations, but I wanted to be complete.
Now, on to the question about the use of valium in cats. Again, valium is not my first choice for sedation of most cats. I prefer acepromazine orally. If I were to use valium I would start with 1mg orally and adjust accordingly. I stress that THIS WOULD NOT BE MY FIRST CHOICE!
Leslie Easterwood, DVM
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Shedog
Posted on Sunday, November 7, 1999 - 9:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Debra....you might also try an Elizabethan Collar. I've used one for a biting, old dog and at least got most of her groomed without harm to her or me.

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